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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we had had a trade surplus last year for first time in almost ho years. and with technology investment many the u.k., now at 10-year high, it's not just the omed industries that are growing again, it is the new. so with all this and more, i truly believe that in this new century, just as in the centurys that came before, our done fri, britain can succeed. so let me turn. helping britain sell abroad is the fy tall part of the answer. but winning abroad actually begins at home. our country will only rise if we let our people rise. if we break aspiration and those who wanted to get on in life that means sorting out our welfare system and education because the most powerful natural resources we have are our people. i took the whole cabinet today to an academy school in bristol to show the transformation we need in our education system right across country. we need schools with high standards and high expectations so all our children get a proper start in this new competitive world. of course, we also need to deal with the deaf so it we can safeguard low interest rates and give b
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
for systems for r an d. science and technology. the benchmark needed in western pacific. there's a whole pan plea of means which we will rebalance. ships are important they are good measure. there's more as we look forward the future and we meet the requirements of our defense strategic guidance in the regard. so having laid that out, i commend that to you as our future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14. it's to support the theafort i mentioned to you. i think we're on track and prepared to meet our national security commitment to the regard and the defense strategic guidance. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. [applause] your article in foreign policy speaks to balancing the force. how do international navies play in to your stag -- strategy? >> the international navy play in to the descrat gi by mission. i think and by alliances that we've had. let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific, the japanese maritime self-defense force plays a we cooperate with them to share what we call long range track mission there
in the cyberworld. technology drives everything we do the world wide web has made us more interconnected than at any time in our human history. the vast majority of our emperor structure resides in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure in the united states reside in the private sector. the national security risks and economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with all of our partners. our partners of the private sector. for those, but the work of the government or private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desired is. this private sector holds a lot of data. these assets are pretty profound. their protection to the united states priorities is of national importance. the president declared recently, and i quote, here is a list of priorities, this is in the top five. the cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation and america's economic prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cyber security.
will be better equipped. it will mean less spending on technology, less capital available, and less capital for entrepreneurs. a decline in american ingenuity would be a consequence and over time, there would be a decline of more -- our position. as oil prices adjust, market forces could reach a point where investors refuse to buy u.s. treasury bonds. we see investors' reaction to the potential of these realizations now through an aversion to risk. trillion7's, over $1 have flowed into bonds and a greater amount has flowed out of equities. in addition, this act set as a deterrent for investment 3 $1 trillion moving into fixed income where fixed-income is basically paying zero. that shows a fundamental aversion to risk which is new to our society and culture since 2007. for companies able to access the credit markets, the times have been pretty good. investors' appetite for this debt translates into cheap money for many companies. many star companies and this applies to what glenn was reckoned -- referencing -- [inaudible] rely on equity financing. the vicious cycle we're in today, the side
which ignores the quantum leap in weapons technology between then and now. as the president pointed out in the debates, no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it, next ten. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment, it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighter military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> glor: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take
honestly is the lack of an overall information technology architecture you and i have talked about this before, and it still doesn't exist today as far as i know. i've pointed that out and my committee has pointed that out and outside they've looked at the va's i.t. department and have pointed that out. i'm just not convinced that five years from now given that i don't know where you will be, but my fear is that we are going to be sitting here talking about the same issue again because we are not going about it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on i
, has caved into this military worship of technology. i've seen that in the last 20 years grow. in the '90s and 2000s, we seem to give a pass always to the military. >> since i get over here about the military, it's almost impossible to criticize anyone in the military because there's such patriotism towards it and i get that, but it is particularly pronounced in america, it is almost seen as utter disloyalty if not treachery to criticize any military man or woman. that's dangerous, isn't it? >> it leads back to rome. go back to the roman empire. emperors would pay homage and favors and pay them more money to be loyal to that faction. eventually the roman guards, military, became more important than the citizenry. of course, they didn't hold up the empire. they are all over the place but they couldn't hold back the barbarians and so forth. it doesn't work. you don't bribe the military. frankly, we could be in a position where things get more chaotic and there could be another terrorist attack and this concept of american security is so violated that the military could act in a
. the memorial finally opened in 2004. >> as times change so does technology including how we share photos and memories with family and friends. and that is especially true today as we remember our veterans. now with that story from the united states marine corps wall memorial. >> sites allow us to share with the world our pride and our gratitude. >> i joined the marine corps in 1949 when i was 18 years old. >> on the day we salute veterans. >> it's a day to remember service and sacrifice. >> we are reminded that so many of the stories that shaped our nation begin and end at the monuments honoring those who heard the call. >> i was in vietnam. >> for veterans like marine pete dela santos. >> in korea. >> these icons in bronze, granite and stone forge and define countless families including his. >> out of five brothers, three of us were marines. one was air force, one was army. >> the men who gave their lives or part of themselves for us allowed a country to progress at a remarkable rate. so as i per used facebook on veterans day i was touched by
store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set and for 5 days only enjoy 36 month financing on selected beds but only through monday. you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >> a devastating explosion at a neighborhood in indianapolis. the force
phone. across the parched land of the dense rain forests of the congo. technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment, this reminds me of the arrival of punk rock in the mid- 70's. the clash was the very base of the rock-and-roll pyramid. overnight they gave the finger to be dreadful business that was at the top of the pyramid. it was called progressive rock. epix song, know the lyrics. great reviews. -- epic songs, no good lyrics. great reviews. but the band made no pretense of being better than the audience appeared they were the audience. virtuosity was out. the clash were like a public- service announcement with the cars. -- guitars. they gave u2 the idea that social activism could make for a good social right. i would like to point out none of your professors as ever draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. [applause] [laughter] little intermission. ok. sharpen your pencils. i do not need to lecture you about change of the air you breathe. you are in it. i thin
will take money from the airline industry that would otherwise be invested in nextgen technologies and the purchase of new aircraft, two proven methods for improving environmental performance and for reducing emissions. airlines for america and air transport trade association testified before our aviation subcommittee last year that the extraction of capital from the aviation system as enadviceaged under the e.u.'s emission trading scheme could threaten over 78,000 american jobs. this is unacceptable. but despite serious legal issues and ons -- objections by the international community, the european union is pressing ahead with its plans. in september, 2012, 21 countries, including the united states, signed a joint declaration against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illeg
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. oral-b power brushes. ♪♪ you can help othersnk along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> i am harris falkner, this is the fox report. time for the top of the news, breaking new details on the scandal that brought the career of general petraeus to an abrupt end. we are learning more and how it uncovered the relationship. officials sending harassing e-mails were sent to a woman named jill kelly. that is jill kelly second from the right in the photo sending right next to the general's wife holly. kelly was a family friend of the petraeus's. she got the e-mails she complained to federal investiga
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
technology or delivery system reform or something solves the problem, which is quite conceivable, is it really urgent that we try to settle this problem to the extent that it's a problem between now and the holidays or in the spring of 2013? again, i think the rational person would ask, you know, this is kind of like saying, well, you know, your parents had cancer when they were 60, so at the age of 20 you should go ahead and have an operation just in case, right? just to make sure. it might develop in 30 or 40 years. well, then why is it -- and this is, ultimately, a political question. it's not an economic question. why is anyone talking about fixing social security and medicare in the next six months? or the next, for that matter, five or six weeks? as part of a grand bargain? why are you even discussing this? and even if there were a few irrational people saying things, why would anyone take it seriously? i think this shows the answer. this is one of the ways that you can cut social security benefits that have been discussed as a possible part of the grand bargain. monique me
an impact from weakness particularly in europe on our technology business but we're seeing strong revenue growth and improving earnings in our services businesses. mixed bag. >> you've been talking about your services led business, part of the transformation of the company. at this point how much does that make up of the company in. >> a little bit more than half of our revenues. if you look forward to 2017 it will probably be two-thirds of our revenues not only driven by the fact we are growing that portion of the business but because the market's transitioning, customers are transitioning. they want more than a point solution. they want us to help them change the way they get business done so it's an exciting and growing portion of our portfolio. >> how does that change who your competitors are? >> it's a great question actually. our traditional competitors in the hardware business is hp and rico and cannon. now we have a large number of smaller less capitalized competitors mixed in with a few large competitors. we have transportation competitors, customer care competitors, we have heal
, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the downfall of david petraeus showed no sign of fading into the background today. instead, there was every indication that his admission of adultery will echo far beyond the end of his career at the c.i.a. >> a personal scandal forces c.i.a. director david petraeus to... >> i want to start out with this out of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve his biographer paula broadwell. her book came out last january. appearing on c-span she recalled first meeting petraeus several years earlier. >> he came to harvard university where i was a g
the western pacific within a doctrine of the systems for r&d and science and technology and by means which we will rebalanced the ships were important to meet our strategic guidance in this regard. i commend that to you as the future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14 if the support in this very a4a that i mentioned to you in this regard in the defense and strategic guidance. thank you very much and i look forward to your questions. [applause] how do they plan to your strategy? >> mission by mission i think and by alliances that we have had, and let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific. the japanese maritime self-defense force plays that we cooperate with them to share what we call long-range search and track mission and the mission there in korea this should interest to continue to do that in a similar manner so the alliance as we have we are taking those. with regard to the kind of policies in the gulf of aden they played a major part we have a major collision maritime force that is called 151 in the gulf of the damage has been l
for assistance, for r and d, science and technology. there is a whole panoply of means by which we will rebalance. ships are important, but there is so much more as we look forward to the future, and we need to requirements of our shuja guidance in this regard. having laid that out, i commend that to you as our future, and how we see things today. as we prepare a budget for the fiscal year 2014, it is to support this very effort i mentioned to you. we are on track and prepare to meet our national security commitment in this regard, and the defense strategic guidance. that you very much, and i look forward to your questions. [applause] >> or article speaks about balancing the force. how international ladies played into your strategy? >> the international ladies played into the strategy of my mission, and by the alliance is that we have had. let me speak to the alliance. i spoke to the western pacific. the japanese maritime self- defense force plays -- we cooperate with them to share what we call long-range search and track mission there in the western pacific. what the navies of the republic of ko
at the technology department don't know what to believe when it comes to this guy. megyn: the irony of the security paranoia how he made the money in the first place. the squall treat journal reporting that attorney general eric holder knew of the petraeus investigation as early as september. if that's true why did he not inform white house about it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that right after the break. a high school * hockey league coming under fire for a plan to save money by putting "the national anthem" on ice. >> i don't agree with it. it's a bad policy. >> this investigation has been going on for months. how is it that the white house didn't have any idea of this until the day after the election? and congress a few days later? >> well, i would refer you to the fb with i. they have, as i understand it, protocols in place for when they notify the legislative and executive branches of investigations. and it is, you know, simply a fact that the white house was not aware of the situation regarding general petraeus until wednesday, and the situation regarding general allen until frid
technology? >> and i think they are. i think what's interesting is the more engagement you see in the palm of your hand, you realize that's an opportunity we're all going after. >> i know mark zuckerberg tried to hire you in 2006. are you sorry you turned him down? >> it was one of the mistakes i made. i feel very lucky to have been part of many companies and i got to see interesting companies grow, everything from twitter to facebook to google, and for me, it's really about knowing the smartest people in the world, because i feel like i get to learn more from them. >> and now you get the chance to meet charlie and gayle. >> exactly. >> nick faldo won the masters and the british open three times each. he'll talk this morning of building a perfect golf swing and why tiger woods hasn't won a major title in four years. that's next right here on "cbs this morning." >>> who loves golf? we do. cbs sports golf analyst nick faldo won six grand slam titles in his career. his how-to book for golfers, "a swing for life" has just been updated and rereleased. >> it marks the 25th anniversary of his fir
it comes to the technology that they were using to try to evade the surveillance state that they built. it's amazing. >> the other thing i find amazing is i remember going through the u.s. treasury in the height of the financial crisis, and back then, you had officials who were scribbling down important facts and figures on scrap paper because that was one of the few things they were able to legally throw away and get rid of. and if you go around other branches of the u.s. government today, people are intensely aware of the risks of e-mails being kept. if you go and talk to private sector banks, nobody working on a bank trading floor these days can possibly not be aware of the risks of tracking thoughts and e-mails. and yet somehow the military just seems not to have noticed this. it is very, very striking. >> there's one other dedataidei this "journal" story, kelley had second thoughts. and people said they made the request, quote, she was worried about the personal information being provided to investigators. >> like the diplomatic license plates. >> talk about the horse after it's left
making sure that our workers are getting the degrees they need, including in science, technology, engineering and math, we should be doing much or at the high school level with one and two years decrease. the opportunity of immigration reform that came out loud and clear through this election where you have now 10% of the electorate, hispanic 75% of them voting for the president and you are already hearing many other republicans starting to talk about the possibility of moving on immigration reform. so there are some real opportunities that will move our economy along. if we can compromise a get together on debt, do something insist on tax reform, and then work on these problems like energy, comprehensive energy problems that are opportunity and making. so i am much were optimistic than some. imagine hubert humphrey. actually the original he gave me gordon humphrey suggested by mistake or little-known senator from new hampshire. but eventually they corrected it. >> the president has just given a press covers but i do not get the chance to hear it but he was sounding feisty on the
a company called cultivated risk. we do projects that combined humor and technology to sell better stories, make the world less horrible. so day job permanent job, and between sleep job. it's all i think about. i want to be one of those makers, not one of the stickers >> how has having a black president affected your work? >> well, it gives me one other job that is accessible now, which is great. you can add that to the list of the ag and athletes and sassy black woman, also president. that is pretty cool. expanded the range. it is a fun and proud image. it also created some challenges. president obama as a symbol of massive racial progress is often overstated. so it makes the argument more complicated. our work here is finished as america in the great racial project of equal opportunity. it really isn't, and so having a black president is a shortcut to avoid the difficult conversations and work that we still have to do as a nation. great progress has been achieved, but there is still so much more to go. obama is at challenging figure. he makes us to more than we really have. >> how to be
the technology now to make this information available online -- almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. o2 dirt on the independent line -- we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggregate debt even more dart -- and aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: laura riding on twitter, -- in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic li
water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. 100% new. ♪ 100% greek. 100% mmm... ♪ oh wow, that is mmm... ♪ in fact it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. well ok then, new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. ♪ which house is yours? the one with the silverado out front. so, what do you do? well, ahhh... nice! [ clown horn ] was his name ♪ [ shouting ] [ child crying ] ♪ i...ahh. [ male announcer ] the chevy silverado. the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. from worksite to home front. chevy runs deep. >>> jack's back with the cafferty file. jack? >> question this hour, wolf, is what does the republican party have to do to become more relevant? may not be as dire as we make it out to be. mitt romney did get over 50 million votes. still, lee in wyoming writes, "the party of no is too narrow. it will go the way of the dinosaurs if it can't
, biofuels, clean energy research and the technologies of tomorrow and factories to build the stuff in the united states. not just energy, but the stimulus is going to drag our antiquated health care system into the digital era so that your doctor might not kill you at this chicken scratch handwriting by 2015 just about every american will have an electronic medical record, which really should improve care and reduce costs and is really a down payment on health care reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades with race to the top of the largest infrastructure investment since eisenhower. it had the largest research investment other, the largest middle-class tax cut since reagan went to more than 95% of the country in less than 10% of the country noticed it. with great politics. so again my book i did try to get deep into the bowels of the white house in the backroom of capitol hill, but also tried to be a fly on the wall and the energy energy departments weatherization division. it's actually known as the turkey farm. i went to local high-speed rail meetings
to beat our behinds in november. they were investing in technology and infrastructure and a ground game that was beyond 21st century. their ability to identify their voter even when that voter looked like our voter. that's the interesting thing that your statistics are showing folks who looked like a republican voter turned out to be an obama voter because they identified them, worked them and got them to the polls. host: blake is on the phone on the republican line in alabama caller: \[indiscernible] that was a long long time ago i guess. thanks for service to the party. i see first of all -- i was curious about a couple of numbers but before i get to that just a quick point about the money that people are talking about, how much money, that money made no difference and it seems like money made all the difference. in the summer romney had no money and obama was savaging him and he could not respond. and he was -- as a rich fellow and didn't care about the people. he never responded because he had no money. money was the problem. but coming to the statistics what i'm curious what percen
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)